Tag Archives: Digital Rights Management

The King’s Clothes: He’s Naked, and So is the Artist!

In an article I read in the New York Times this morning, Streaming Shakes Up Music Industry’s Model for Royalties: As Music Streaming Grows, Royalties Slow to a Trickle, it’s not hard to see what needs to be done to help the starving artist into extinction, and the phat artist get a bit leaner.  Lawsuits?  No! Artists are biting into this hook line and sinker.  I think the really shocking bit that no one ever really wants to say because of the huge artists  which take in a lot more than other artists, is for similar reasons we don’t show the salaries of our fellow employees.  However, in some cases consumers do seem to gasp and rally around the starving employee’s or artists, in this case, when there is such a stark contrast in the earnings, such as in a developing nation, consumers seem to rally the troops.  Also, the Hollywood Industry seems to be OK with releasing the extravagant earnings of some of the top making actors and actresses.  If the Music Industry Association were to try to rally the troops to make an API (Application Interface) a requirement, and allow third parties to pull amounts of net royalties dynamically, or whenever those amounts are committed, as well as based upon each artist opting in or out, i.e. if artist, opts-out, they must be doing well might be the assumption, that transparency may shame the consumer into going in another direction with their music purchasing style.  If I can go to a Blog, and view a dashboard that shows the net royalties of any artist, and has a N/A for which artists have opted out, and you can see those tallies slowly rise, or static based on the committed time to book the royalties, music lovers may empathize with the artist.

A second, and parallel approach, is to just peel back Spotify, and look at the functionality, see what the consumer is getting beyond the streaming model, and offer it up similarity using a more artist,  consumer, distributor amenable cost model.  Don’t tell me it is all just the streaming aspect that attracts the customer, because it is certainly not.  Looking at the application, and how people interact with it I spot a few features off the back that are alluring.

Receive Ad Revenue from your Video Stream of Live Event Coverage

In the not to distant future, distribution rights holders of sporting events and concerts will encourage people to hashtag the event with a link to the event goers’ proprietary streaming video.   ‘External viewers’ of the event can pick up your stream, your coverage of the event.  The event goer providing their Unique Perspective video streaming coverage will receive Ad Revenue for their live stream, which will increase based upon viewership of their event coverage.

The exclusive distributor of the event content (licensee) provides a proprietary streaming application which has Digital Rights Management (DRM) built in so the ‘external viewers’ or subscribers of the event can select one of many view /  feeds, and the DRM prevents the copy of the content, except for the ‘licensee’ who can archive all the streamed content.

What do the “event goers” get who are producing this LIVE, ‘unique perspective‘ content?  Just like affiliate advertising networks, the content creators, and ‘in-part’ distributors would be able to derive revenue based on a number of factors, including  number of views, duration of views, etc.

The exclusive distributor / event licensee may curriate all content into a single platform, e.g. Event Smartphone / Tablet app, that enables those who aren’t at the event to see “ALL” streams in realtime, or after the event, On-Demand.

Also, don’t forget to stream those tailgate parties, and impromptu interviews.

Thanks goes to the New York Times regarding the NBC article and the exclusivity of their Olympic Coverage which sparked the neurons in my head to derive the idea.  Please also see the post: Freelance Streaming Video, Affiliate Advertising Innovation for more implementation details.