Tag Archives: Video Streaming

Aerial Photography Communities Aligned by Interest, Broadcast in Realtime

Although I fail to see the excitement and mass appeal of aerial drone use, the hobby has taken off on the tail end of military UAV.  Just like the stationary 24/7 webcams, and web sites that catalog these cams, the drone networks, or communities may spawn entirely new interest groups.

Do you have a drone with the ability to stream video in realtime?  You may drive a following to your stream based upon a multitude of reasons, e.g. location; subject(s) of focus.  Once airborne, your drone may broadcast to a web site that tracks your drone’s latitude and longitude, as well as dynamically tagging the feed with relevant frame data.  Object recognition may scan each frame, or a sampling for ‘objects of interest’.  Objects of interest may appear to a community of enthusiasts as a ‘tag cloud’.  Users may select a tag, and drill down to a list of active feeds.  Alternatively, users may bring up a map view to show the active drones flights.  The drones may also show ‘bread crumbs’ of a flight, maybe the last 1/2 hour,  the buffered video available.  Could be just an extension of YouTube, or a new platform designed entirely around Drone Realtime Streaming.

Verizon Poised to offer the Digital Media Food Chain: Content Creation to Distribution

The service, which Verizon only refers to as OTT, or over-the-top, named because it will be available to anyone with an Internet connection, as opposed to a television subscription, is the company’s big growth engine for the future. So far, the company has been mum on the details.

The telecom company is readying a mobile and online video service for launch in late summer, and a top exec says there’s nothing like it.

Verizon continues to line up video content from partners as well as through acquisitions, such as AOL.

Source: Verizon mulls mobile video that doesn’t eat into your data cap – CNET

Entertainment Portals, and Opportunities for Target State

This posting is an assessment of the current state of entertainment portals, and opportunities for future, target states.  This post may be updated as additional portals are evaluated, and system capabilities are added. System capabilities listed maybe mutually exclusive.

Entertainment Portal Analysis in PDF Format

ENT Portal Delivery Model - Slide 1
ENT Portal Delivery Model – Slide 1
ENT Portal Delivery Model - Slide 2
ENT Portal Delivery Model – Slide 2
ENT Portal Delivery Model - Slide 3
ENT Portal Delivery Model – Slide 3
ENT Portal Delivery Model - Slide 4
ENT Portal Delivery Model – Slide 4
ENT Portal Delivery Model - Slide 5
ENT Portal Delivery Model – Slide 5
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ENT Portal Delivery Model – Slide 6
ENT Portal Delivery Model - Slide 7
ENT Portal Delivery Model – Slide 7
`ENT Portal Delivery Model - Slide 8
ENT Portal Delivery Model – Slide 8

Video Streaming Services Roadmap for Content Suppliers, and Enhanced Portals

Approved and Reviewed for Relevancy June 12th, 2017

Netflix and Amazon Prime Movies use a scrolling carousel for their users to browse through their movies.  For Television series, web streaming services use a generic, series specific, image to articulate the whole series.  Movies simply show the cover of the movie box with options such as Play Trailer.

An augmented paradigm can help their viewers to select videos.  For Television, if the viewer selects a TV series, instead of showing a text description about the episodes listed for the seasons and episodes, each of the TV episodes for a season could be tiled across the screen.  The user first selects a season, and all the episodes for the season would be displayed in tile format.  If the user hovers over the episode image, the episode information could be displayed in a popup text box.   A “best scene in show” video clip can be played by the viewer.  “Best in Show” clips would be selected by the content provider’s expert media staff .

Going Beyond the Movie Trailer

If a user hovers over a movie box image, four small buttons popup over the image in the foreground and are accentuated.  The movie image gets dim in the background.  This viewing paradigm is similar to the cnet.com web site that uses the mechanism for viewing their stories, and for socializing their stories through Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and email.  Selecting one of the three buttons will play a ‘content expert’ or a ‘viewer’s choice, favorite scene’. The fourth button goes to the show details page of the movie, as it does today.  Using this media portal format introduces additional ‘value add’ by the content providers, and makes the service go beyond the streaming of video.  The value proposition is simple, customers get entertaining insights into a movie they MAY select to watch, and the web streaming service is perceived to be more than just streaming, the service is filled with knowledgeable, entertainment media staff.

The movie expertise provided by the video streaming service may grow into favorite movie quotes, and optionally accompanied sound bites. An actor’s filmography may be displayed in the details section of the movie, with the option to drill down to the media content, if available for streaming or purchase. Furthermore, streaming services may partner with established movie expertise web sites.  Amazon’s Instant Video integrates media expertise from their IMdb,  Amazon property.  Video streaming services offered today are very little beyond, finding a random movie that catches your eye, or search for your preconceived movie, and take a chance to watch it.    Very little value add, if any, is provided to the video watcher.  Any company dipping their toe into this space has significant opportunity to distinguish themselves from other existing services.   Specifically, the content owners that go to the web streaming service model.  They are the best positioned to provide significant value add to their line up.  Throwing a large video archive at consumers shows the tremendous depth of available videos, but may be daunting for the video streaming subscriber.  However, if the streaming service are providers of expertise around their owned content, such as TV series out takes, cast interviews, scrapped clips, and any pilots that the providers never aired are just a few ideas.

Welcome to the beginning of the web video streaming services that mature as more content owners push the envelope with their power to create content, and maximize the usability of their assets.

Can Amazon leverage it’s IMDb asset and Alexa to guide your entertainment choices in a palatable way?  With Amazon’s brilliant implementation of X-Ray, one can only hope.

Players and Ball Tagged with WiFi for an Enhanced Sports Experience

I was reading about MLB’s iBeacon driven events that are in proximity to you, and receiving advertisements, or interactive content for the “physical event”.  As I’ve mentioned, I would like to see from my seat in the stands, a real time, dynamic score card, that shows me players trying to steal a base, as an example, or show me an error in progress, awesome.

One step further, feel the bone crushing view of a wide receiver driving the ball, and feel the wall of defense men stop me with a vibration, a jolt and real time video of the catch, and the eventual stop at the N yard line.  Put that in your XBox One, get in the game with enhanced realism never before experienced by a spectator.

Google Chromecast Review – Watch CNET’s Video Review

Google Chromecast Review – Watch CNET’s Video Review.

Video Streaming from major distributors for 35 USD?  Wow!  Too bad not all TVs are equipped with USB, but close enough that all new TVs seem to have them.  My cable box has USB input, so I wonder.  Nah, probably won’t work.  Please Motorola?  Google owns Motorola and so, although enabled by the media channel distribution network, USB could be an easy sell to turn on, the cable box hardware manufacturer to the media channel distributor, e.g.  cable company. Oh, yeah, FYI – my cable box is made by Motorola.

TV Providers Give Away Thin Client Tablets, with Video Streaming Only

It’s an interesting concept, where your television or video provider, when you sign up with them, gives you light weight, thin client tablets that are capable of few commands, e.g. such as changing channels.  The hardware for these tablets have minimum CPU and RAM requirements, just enough to perform quality video stream, but little multitasking or app execution.  In essence your television provider throws in very inexpensive, limited capability televisions, i.e tablets, so the whole family can watch whatever they want via WiFi through their own or on the go, vastly distributed, hot spots around your state, and their WiFi, Hot Spot domain.   Everyone can watch their own channel, and as in other articles I’ve mentioned, they could watch their own perspective of the same show, such as we have seem in the media where European Soccer will have multiple channels of views to cover the same event, i.e. they will have multiple video cameras filming and broadcasting showing a different view of ‘the game’.  So if a group of people are hanging around on a couch watching the game, the main view could be on the big television, while each person in the room has a thin client tablet watching their own view of the game.

It may be not far off in the distant future, that hot spot providers charge a lease fee to other providers, just like we had leased cell towers to cover the gaps, almost a roaming type situation, but for hot spots, before we go to a wide area coverage, such as N. America.

 

Raspberry Pi Streaming Verses Amazon Instant Video, Apple / Google TV, and Netflix

I still can’t get over the fact that for 45 USD, you can take a Raspberry Pi board, and an RCA or HDMI cable, you can create a video streaming device and retrofit your existing Television.  Wow, amazing.  So, in short, does the value add of the graphical user interface, and the physical hardware of a device such as a streaming branded device, such as Apple, or Google TV, or web streaming only product, such as Amazon Instant Video, also offered on the Amazon Fire, outweigh the cost effective mechanism.  It’s all economics, and opportunity cost for you, i.e., a personal decision.  The only factors I would add into the mix, is you have both the web only and hardware specific devices in one cost effective device, which theoretically, someone could overly an inexpensive User Interface to access all four.  The Amazon Fire also offers the benefits of a Tablet.

The interfaces and devices are slick, so it’s a very tough decision.

Notes: Raspberry Pi BoardHDMI CableRaspberry Pi Quick Start Guide

BI Applied to YouTube Yields Value for Advertising, Marketing, & Sales

Google has scanned and indexed books, and showed the most commonly used words, and added meta data, based on book publishing year, genre, and so on.  It would be great to see that functionality come to YouTube.  Business Intelligence (BI) applied to video libraries yields profit for advertising, sales, and marketing.

Every video, in a batch process, gets analyzed for words used, as well as a word count per word, and there is meta data regarding the video, such as genre, and any other user provided information.  Then as videos get processed, a tag bubble cloud as the high level view shows dynamically the most commonly used words get bigger, and the relatively less appearing / said in the view get smaller.  Someone can then click on that word, and drill down to other information about the word, in a sense business intelligence about the word.  Advertisers, for example, may target certain classes, or word tags for their advertisements to appear.  Another profitable model may be to use this business intelligence for business presentations to understand what are the most frequently used words in business speeches, or presentations, based on a current time period, x and y dates, to track what are the buzz words, and even more granular, the business current buzz words of a specific sector, and global region.

Even the music industry can get into the act by getting ‘current phrases’ and incorporate them into their songs.

Our Mind’s Eye Stream for Sale: Who will Own those Portals?

As we approach a brave new world of our Mind’s Eye for Sale, who will own that portal, or jump page to other view’s or other perspectives?  It gets more and more expensive to see the world, and harder to travel.  Sound like Total Recall, the movie, not far off from the path we’re already on without even realizing.  Portals to other people’s perspectives, such as Instagram, seeing life from other people’s interpretations of the world, it is fascinating and alluring to us.

Once the Genie is out of the bottle, it’s hard to turn back.  In all sincerity, a lightweight version of Google’s Android OS for Glass may even be downloadable, and free as it is based on open source.  The Glass is super stylish, but super expensive.  If you’re in the main stream you can afford the glass, if not, you can build your own.  Not that difficult relatively speaking, a kit from Texas Instruments perhaps, such as we’ve seen in the PC world, where they now offer small computer kits for building small computers with Android, and Linux.  If you wanted to build your own Google Glass, how fast will there be imitations, I imagine, faster than you can blink an eye, pun intended.

Google will make it popular and sexy, after that, there could be a flood of imitations.  After all, today we can all build knock off Google Glass, a tiny web cam, a lightweight OS, and Bluetooth integrated with your smartphone for two way interaction, streaming, and communications.  The lightweight OS could today be Linux, but the champion for this effort , Red Hat? No, they are a support and solutions group for a blend of Unix.   No, there are a few hurdles that Google must and have taken, in some cases, partnered with Verizon, who had their own blend of HUD at the 2013 CES conference.  Today, we might mock and jeer people who wore glasses with a mini cam on their glasses.  It might be clunky, the idea is to make it alluring to the masses, as well as going through iterations to make it an acceptable medium to the public.  Once Google, the trailblazer in this endeavor burns through the problems, it will pave the way for a massive wave of alternate choices, become a commodity.  It’s not just the issue with the UI, there are legal battles to be fought, privacy for example, is it safe to drive with them on, and so on.  There needs to be mainstream platforms, so people take advantage, and are lured to independent platforms.  Many other companies might follow, such as Amazon or other cloud based companies.  Maybe even independent sites, web sites, mobile apps, and others joining and integrating with APIs.